Cape Jasmine

$27.93 $39.90
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Cape Jasmine:(Gardenia radicans), This striking shrub makes a stunning Bonsai with its Yellow or White fragrant flowers. The foliage is small, and it is a vigorous grower, making it an excellent species for Bonsai. The Jasmine is native to Asia and South Africa, making it a sub-tropical plant and cannot endure Canadian winters. It must be well ventilated if placed indoors as the Jasmine likes lots of air. The Jasmine likes lots of light but should be protected from direct sunlight during mid-day, so a well-shaded area is best. Outdoors during mid-spring to early fall is ideal. Although no trees want to be moved around, this is especially so with the Cape Jasmine. So refraining from constant movement is best. Also, try not to touch the flower petals when they come out, as this will cause staining of the petals. 


BONSAI CARE


The Cape Jasmine must be protected from the harsh sun, and mid-day shade is necessary. Being a sub-tropical plant, the Cape Jasmine must be brought indoors when the temperature drops below 10° celsius or can be grown indoors year-round. A grow light will help produce healthy leaves and flowers when grown indoors, and when warm enough, placing it next to an open window is recommended.


Watering:

  1. Cape Jasmine likes moisture and humidity, do not let the soil dry out between waterings. Cae Jasmine that are grown indoors will enjoy misting daily.  


Training:


  • Pruning: The best time to prune the Cape Jasmine is after flowering, removing the wilted flowers.
  • Wiring: Cape Jasmine should be wired from June to August during the growing season when the branches are soft. 


  • Repotting: Cape Jasmine needs to be repotted every 2-3 years during development during the summer. Mature trees require repotting every 4-6 years. Jasmine like acidic soil, so adding Kanuma or an acid additive to the soil when repotting is recommended. 


PRODUCT DETAILS 

BABY: 6"-10" tall, comes in a 4" grower's pot. 

YOUNG: 8"-12" tall, comes in a 6" grower's pot. 



 

These are not seeds - But an Actual Living Bonsai Tree.

Please see our Choosing a Bonsai page for the age and dimensions regarding the different stages of our Bonsai (Baby, Young, & Mature).

 

Soil (Substrate)

Bonsai soils are usually a mixture of organic potting compost (Pine Bark or Forest Floor), Akadamapumice, lava rock in varying amounts. 

It is important for the soil have good water retention while also draining well, along with very good aeration. The quality of the soil directly affects the health, size and growth of your tree. One of the worst things you can do to your tree is plant it in regular garden soil. Garden soil hardens when it drys and can often lead to a disadvantage when growing a Bonsai. 

Soil mixtures can be purchased here, but given their weight and cost of shipping, you can also easily make your own. 

 

Depending on the type of Bonsai you're growing, here are the general formulas for successful mixtures. 

Deciduous Tree (Leafy and looses leafs in the fall)

50% Akadama

20% Pumice

20% Lava Rock

10% Potting Compost

 

Coniferous Tree (Evergreen like Juniper, Cedar)

1/3 Akadama

1/3 Pumice

1/3 Lava Rock

 

If you are not able to check on your Bonsai's moisture levels daily, add more Akadama to the mix. 

Given how these soils erode over time, repotting every 2-3 years is required. 

 

Here are some suitable replacements if you cannot find the recommended types of soil.

  • Akadama - fine fired or baked clays, some even recommend cat litter as a substitute. 
  • Pumice - fine crushed aggregates, expanded shale and vermiculite.
  • Lava Rock - This can be replaced with fine gravel or you can also look into purchasing a larger lava rock at a hardware or gardening centre and crushing it. 

 

Fertilizer

One of the best and easiest ways to fertilize your Bonsai, is to add a liquid fertilizer mix when water your Bonsai's once a month during the spring/summer. If your Bonsai looses leaves in the winter there is no need to fertilize it then. If you have a coniferous tree, fertilizing the tree once in the beginning of winter and once in the middle of winter should be sufficient.

  

Customer Reviews

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C
Charlene Coombs Coombs (Toronto, CA)
great trees

The minute the 3 trees arrived I got a book of bonsai for beginners. They bring some fresh air to the place.

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